Extract from Britain's Greatest Rail Disaster - The Quintinshill Blaze of 1915 - by J. A. B. Hamilton – pages 63-64

Extract from Britain's Greatest Rail Disaster - The Quintinshill Blaze of 1915 - by J. A. B. Hamilton – pages 63-64

22nd May 1915

T. G. Clark modestly refused to give his rank, so I can only say that the Regimental History names a 2nd Lieutenant T. G. Clark among the injured. He was travelling in the front coach. "We were going fast. Then we were going along the sleepers, it seemed. We were deluged with water (this would be from the tender of No 121, which had its side torn off). Then the second train smashed into our carriage, and I passed out. The next thing I remember is lying in the field with a broken pelvis and a dislocated hip joint. We were put on the express and taken to Carlisle. All the five officers in Mr Clark's compartment were injured, but they were marvellously lucky to escape with their lives. The three officers in the next compartment were all killed; they were Major J. D. L. Hamilton, commanding A Company, Captain J. M. Mitchell, his second-in-command, and Lieutenant C. R. Salvesen, the son of a former commanding officer. They had to be listed as missing, for no trace of any of them was found. The remaining seven officers were travelling in the centre of the train and were uninjured.

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  • Profile picture for John Monfries Mitchell

    Born 1882

    Died 1915

    British Army Captain Royal Scots 7th Battalion