BATTLE HONOURS PART 1 - KILMARNOCK MAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS - THE KILMARNOCK STANDARD - Saturday, November 20, 1915.

BATTLE HONOURS PART 1 - KILMARNOCK MAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS - THE KILMARNOCK STANDARD - Saturday, November 20, 1915.

24th September 1915 - 27th September 1915

We are pleased to learn that our young townsman Second Lieutenant Joseph Wilson, son of Mr Joseph Wilson, Howard Street (late organist of the Laigh Kirk), has been awarded the Military Cross “for conspicuous gallantry on Hill 70 on September 26.” The official announcement states that “he collected and rallied stragglers and led them through the troops of another division who were retiring. With these men he remained in the most advanced position during the night.” Lieutenant Wilson enlisted in the Sixth Service Battalion Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders in the second week of September 1914, being at once appointed a Corporal, and a fortnight later he was promoted Sergeant. In April this year he received his commission as Second Lieutenant. He was formerly connected with the 1st V.B.R.S.F. and the 4th R.S.F. (Territorials) for a period of seven years, retiring with the rank of Sergeant and he was also a Sergeant in the Kilmarnock Academy Cadet Corps. After joining the Cameron Highlanders, he was in training at Aldershot, Bramshot and Basingstoke. He served his apprenticeship with Glenfield & Kennedy, Ltd., and was afterwards with Messrs Grant, Ritchie & Co. Latterly he was with an important firm at Luton as inspector of agents, and he resigned a lucrative appointment in order to respond to the call of King and country. Lieut. Wilson has always been fond of shooting and is an excellent marksman. He has competed frequently at the Ayrshire Rifle Association’s meeting with varying success and in 911 he was in the King’s Hundred and the Queen’s Hundred at Bisley. He captained the 15th Division’s team in the shoot for Divisions of Kitchener’s Army at Aldershot and was top-scorer of the team. He was married shortly before leaving for the front. The 6th Camerons greatly distinguished themselves in the fighting at Hill 70 on 26th September. They were in the 15th Division when the attack was started on the 25th. The whole story of the battle is not yet known, but it is certain that the 6th Camerons went for Hill 70 and took it, and spent the night holding on to the west side of it – all that could be retained. “It was a fine piece of work,” says one account. “When the day broke the advanced positions were held by the shattered 15th Division, including a fraction of the 6th Camerons.” Major Angus Falconer Douglas-Hamilton (Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel), who was in command of the 6th Camerons, unfortunately lost his life. His name appears at the head of the list of V.C.’S published this week and it is officially stated that “it was mainly due to his bravery, untiring energy and splendid leadership that the line at this point was enabled to check the enemy’s advance.” It is further reported of him that “when the battalions on his left and right had retired he rallied his own battalion again and again and led his men forward four times. The last time he led all that remained, consisting of about fifty men, in a most gallant manner and was killed at their head.” Under adverse circumstances Lieutenant Wilson bravely and heroically “collected and rallied stragglers and led them through the troops of another division who were retiring.” It is a story that touches the heart – a magnificent achievement and one that will be read with pride throughout the land.

Created by: Christine3721

  • Profile picture for Joseph Wilson

    Born 1887

    Died 1917

    British Army Second Lieutenant Cameron Highlanders

    British Army Temporary Captain Cameron Highlanders

    British Army Captain Cameron Highlanders